65 Stories

65 Stories – For Class V-XII, Competitive Exams and Advanced English Learners
by Antara Bhoi


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Learn Story Writing using an Outline

This is how stories should be written in exams to secure full marks.

65 Stories is an indispensable anthology of stories typically asked in the English exams of Class V-XII (CBSE, ICSE, State Boards) and in English competitive exams. The book’s prime focus is to help the learners practise creative story writing from given outlines in exams. It comprises of all story writing exercises from popular Grammar books and academic exams.

Each story in this book is typically over 500 words, and includes the story outline, moral and title. All stories feature liberal use of idiomatic phraseology, proverbs, dialogues and soliloquies. They are carefully curated with correct grammar, sentence structure and punctuation.

Trust 65 Stories to help you secure full marks in your English exams.


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Author Speaks

Most of the stories written by me in this book have really been asked in English exams; one or two were my personal inclusions, the rest are from popular English Grammar books. All in all, these stories are for Class 5 and above students, right upto class 12 of all boards in India and for those appearing in competitive exams.

Although my book is intended mainly for Class V-XII, I hope it will not be shunned by primary students. My plan has been to try to pleasantly remind the students of how they should write story creatively in the exams to secure full marks, and of how they should take care of the tenses, dialogues, title, moral, idioms, phrases, punctuation and sentence structure. With 65 specimens, this book will make you aware of what story writing in exam is all about.

Here’s to your wonderful learning experience with my 65 Stories. Cheers!


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Key Takeaways

1. 65 well written stories for story writing practice.

2. Popular and typical stories from Panchatantra, Aesop’s Fables, The Arabian Nights, Mythology and Hitopadesha that have been asked or are likely in CBSE, ICSE and State Board Exams.

3. No need to refer other book for story writing. Contains stories from popular grammar books.

4. Appropriate use of idiomatic and proverbial phraseology, and dialogues.

5. Unique content written by author. So entire book is premium Copyscape passed, plagiarism checked and Grammarly verified.

6. Useful for Class 5 and above students.

7. Outlines, story titles and morals.


What’s Inside?

1. The Salt Merchant and His Donkey
2. The Frogs Who Desired a King
3. The Crows and the Mean Snake
4. The Lazy King
5. Slow and Steady Wins the Race
6. Where Love is, There is God Also
7. God Sees the Truth, But Waits
8. We’ll See
9. An Apple Tree
10. The King and the Foolish Monkey
11. Tenali Raman Story: The Roots of Rasgulla
12. A Field of Gold
13. A Bundle of Sticks
14. The Fisherman and the Jinn
15. Dharmabuddhi and Paapbuddhi
16. The Larks in the Cornfield
17. Tom and His Aunt
18. The Retiring Carpenter
19. The Hen That Laid Golden Eggs
20. Who Killed the Thief?
21. The Water-Carrier Who Ruled India for a Day
22. The Monkey and the Crocodile
23. The Pact with the Sun
24. Life is an Echo
25. The Honest Woodcutter
26. Father’s Love
27. The Lioness and the Young Jackal
28. The Little Red Hen
29. The Elephant and the Tailor
30. God Coming Home
31. The Lion and the Rabbit
32. The Loyal Mongoose
33. The Tale of Two Birds
34. The Talkative Tortoise
35. The Iron-Eating Rats
36. The Wolf in a Sheepskin
37. Androclus and the Lion
38. The Nobleman, the Fisherman and the Porter
39. The Tiger, Jackal and the Brahmin
40. The Stone on the Road
41. Baghdad Merchant and the Camel-Driver
42. A Purse of a Hundred Pieces of Gold
43. The Old Pipal Tree
44. The Loyal Nurse
45. The Snake Named Mandvisha
46. The Barber of Baghdad
47. King Solomon and the Bees
48. The Tiger and the Golden Bangle
49. The Inchcape Rock
50. Tit for Tat
51. The Blind Lady and a Greedy Doctor
52. The Tale of the Many-Times-Killed Hunchback
53. The Patient Little Girl
54. The Pied Piper of Hamelin
55. The Boy Who Cried “Wolf!”
56. The Rabbit, the Whale and the Elephant
57. The Cunning Fox and the Foolish Crow
58. The Fox and the Goat
59. The Stork and the Crab
60. Shooting the Bird’s Eye
61. The Foolish Stork and the Crab
62. Eklavya’s Loyalty
63. How Squirrel Got Its Stripes
64. Birbal Identifies the Thief
65. The Talking Cave

 


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All Story Writing Outlines

The Salt Merchant and His Donkey

Salt merchant . . . had a donkey who carried heavy loads of salt on its back . . . donkey had to cross a stream to transport the salt to other villages . . . once the donkey slipped in water . . . salt dissolved in water . . . load became lighter . . . donkey felt happy . . . repeated the process of falling in water everyday to lessen the burden . . . merchant suspected the donkey’s evil intentions . . . planned to teach it a lesson . . . loaded cotton on donkey’s back . . . as donkey fell in water cotton became heavy . . . donkey repented his actions . . . moral.


The Frogs Who Desired a King

Frogs tired of self-governing . . . asked Jupiter to give them a king . . . Jupiter threw them a log and said that should be their king . . . frogs terrified . . .  later encouraged by its stillness . . .  disrespect for such a king . . .  asked Jupiter to give them a better king . . . Jupiter threw a crane . . . Frogs admired its beauty . . . but, the crane ate every frog . . . moral


The Crows and the Mean Snake

Crows lived on a tree . . . a snake lived in the hollow of the tree . . . it used to eat up the crow’s young ones . . . crows worried . . .  went to a witty jackal . . .  did as jackal suggested . . . stole a necklace of a queen . . . dropped it into the snake’s hole . . . the queen’s men traced it . . . dug into the hole . . . snake killed . . . moral.


The Lazy King

Lazy king . . . liked to eat and sleep all the time . . . became inactive . . . doctor called to cure him . . . minister of king met a Sadhu . . . Sadhu offered to cure the king . . . called the king to his hut on foot . . . king did as he was told . . . walked all the way to the hut . . . started sweating . . .  Sadhu gave iron ball to the king and asked him to do exercise with it every day . . .  king did as he was told . . . lost weight . . .  got cured . . . moral​


Slow and Steady Wins the Race

A rabbit . . . proud of his fast speed . . . saw a slow tortoise . . . made fun of the his speed . . . the tortoise kept his peace . . . agreed to run a race with the rabbit . . . the rabbit shot off from the starting . . . tortoise not in sight . . . the rabbit fell asleep under a tree . . . tortoise moved on steadily . . . tortoise gradually crossed the rabbit . . . got far away from the rabbit . . . when the rabbit woke up it was too late to win . . . the tortoise won the race . . . moral.


Where Love is, There is God Also

Martin . . . a cobbler . . . his son died . . . no interest in life . . . a religious man reminded that Martin couldn’t judge God’s ways . . . heard a voice . . . “Martin! Look out in the street tomorrow, for I shall come” . . . next morning an old man stood shivering in cold . . . Martin invited him inside . . . offered tea . . . no one came . . . next morning a poor woman stood with a baby in arms . . . Martin gave her his bed, food and cabbage soup . . . Martin kept on waiting but no one came . . . in a dream first saw the old man . . . then the woman with the child . . . Martin crossed himself . . . the Lord had really come to him . . . moral.


God Sees the Truth, But Waits

In Vladimir lived a young merchant Aksyonof . . . going to Nizhny Fair . . . met a merchant at the inn . . . stayed in the adjoining rooms . . . next morning he was arrested . . . blood-stained dagger found . . . remained in prison for 26 years in Siberia . . . one day a new prisoner Makar came . . . from his talks and movements Aksyonof was sure that Makar killed the merchant . . . Makar dug a tunnel . . . asked Aksyonof to go out . . . the tunnel discovered . . . Aksyonof didn’t tell anything about Makar’s conspiracy . . . Makar came to Aksyonof at night . . . wept . . . confessed his guilt to the police . . . Aksyonof died before he could be released . . . moral.


We’ll See

Old farmer . . . has just one horse . . . horse dies . . . people feel sorry for the farmer . . . the farmer maintains his calm . . . says ‘we’ll see’ . . . neighbours gift him a new horse . . . people think he is lucky . . . he says ‘we’ll see’. . . horse runs away . . . people say he is unlucky . . . he says ‘we’ll see’ . . . horse returns with two more horses . . . people say he is lucky . . . he says ‘we’ll see’ . . . his son rides the horse, falls and breaks his leg . . . people feel pity for him . . . farmer says ‘we’ll see’ . . . army come to recruit young people . . . farmer’s son spared . . . people say he is fortunate . . . farmer says ‘we’ll see’ . . . moral.


An Apple Tree

Apple tree in a house . . . small boy plays around it . . . grows up . . . has no time to play with the tree . . . tree feels sad . . . boy comes back after many years . . . asks tree to give him money for toys . . . tree asks boy to pick apples and sell them . . . boy is happy and goes . . . doesn’t return for many years . . . tree sad . . . after few years boy comes again . . . tree becomes happy . . . boy asks for house to live in . . . tree tells him to cut wood from its branches and make a house . . . boy takes wood and again doesn’t return for a few years . . . after many years comes back and asks for a place to rest . . . tree offers roots as a resting place . . . tree compared to parents . . . parents always ready to give . . . selfish children​ always ready to take.


The King and the Foolish Monkey

King . . . had a pet monkey . . . monkey was a fool . . . he was treated royally . . . was allowed to go wherever he liked . . . allowed entry in king’s personal rooms . . . forbidden even for his confidential servants . . . one afternoon king tired . . . slept . . . monkey guarding the king . . . fly came in and sat on king’s chest . . . monkey swayed but it didn’t move . . . monkey angry . . . chased with a sword . . . fly sat on king’s chest again . . . monkey furious . . . hit with his might . . . king’s nose badly wounded . . . monkey thrown out of the palace . . . moral.


Tenali Raman Story: The Roots of Rasgulla

A king . . . ruled Vijay Nagar . . . affluent merchant from Middle Eastern country came to see the city . . . the king happy . . . gave a room in his palace to live . . . the merchant enjoyed the culture, dance and food . . . ate various dishes and desserts every day . . . was served Rasgulla, the delicacy of the city and the king’s favorite dish . . . the merchant loved it . . . thought it was a fruit . . . dreamed of becoming rich by selling the fruit in his country . . . asked for the roots of its plant . . . the chef confused . . . told the problem to the king . . . king also confused . . . asked his courtiers, “What is the root of Rasgulla?” . . . courtiers confused . . . Tenali Raman in the court . . . promised the king to bring the roots of Rasgulla the next day . . . king confused but agreed . . . all the courtiers astonished . . . the very next day, Tenali Raman brought sugarcane in the bowl . . . king pleased . . . the merchant ate sugarcane with enthusiasm . . . “Sugarcane is the root of Rasgulla” said Tenali Raman.


A Field of Gold

A servant of Akbar cleaning Akbar’s room . . . breaks the king’s favorite vase . . . terrified . . . takes the pieces and goes off . . . Akbar notices the missing vase . . . asks the servant about the vase . . . servant says, “I have taken it with me for better cleaning.” . . . Akbar asks to bring the vase back . . . the servant tells king the truth . . . broken vase . . . Akbar punishes him for lying . . . tells this story in the court . . . all the courtiers justify king’s decision . . . Birbal quiet . . . courtiers claim that they have never spoken lies . . . Birbal still quiet . . . Akbar asks Birbal, “Have you ever spoken a lie?” . . . Birbal answers that he tells lies many a times . . . Akbar furious . . . removes Birbal from the court . . . Birbal plans of an idea . . . takes a golden stalk to the king and says if we sow this stalk, it will raise gold . . . king astonished . . . they go to the most fertile soil . . . Akbar orders Birbal to sow the stalk . . . Birbal tells that only people who have not told lies can sow the stalk to raise gold . . . Akbar asks his courtiers to sow the stalk . . . no one comes forward . . . Birbal suggests Akbar to sow the stalk . . . Akbar speechless . . . realizes his mistake . . . moral.


A Bundle of Sticks

A farmer . . . had four sons . . . sons always fighting among themselves . . . father angry . . . planned to teach lesson . . . gave a bundle of sticks . . . asked to break the bundle into pieces . . . all failed . . . father opened the bundle . . . gave one stick to each . . . asked to break the stick . . . all succeeded . . . moral.


The Fisherman and Jinn

A poor fisherman . . . used to cast his net only four times . . . one day, cast his net . . . found in it the carcass of an ass . . . second time came a jar full of mud and sand . . . third time came broken jars and pots . . . last time came a bottle with Solomon’s seal . . . fisherman happy . . . could sell the seal for 10 gold coins . . . rose a cloud from the bottle . . . a Jinn appeared . . . threatened to kill the fisherman . . . the fisherman scared . . . pleaded that he had liberated him . . . Jinn stubborn . . . fisherman thought of a plan to get saved . . . asked how such a huge Jinn could enter the bottle . . . the Jinn entered the bottle to show . . . fisherman sealed bottle again . . . Jinn trapped . . . pleaded . . . fisherman took the bottle and threw it deep into the sea . . . moral.


Dharmabuddhi and Paapbuddhi

Two friends, Dharmabuddhi and Paapbuddhi . . . live happily . . . Paapbuddhi naive person . . . convinces his friend to take him foreign to earn money . . . both go foreign lands and come back with lots of money . . . they hide the money in a forest and take some money . . . one night, Paapbuddhi takes away all the hidden money . . . blames Dharmabuddhi for stealing it . . . quarrel . . . a court case . . . judge decides that the God of the forest is the witness . . . Paapbuddhi scared . . . requests his father to be the God and blame Dharmabuddhi . . . father agrees . . . they go to the forest . . . father hidden in the hollow of a tree . . . says Dharmabuddhi is at fault . . . Dharmabuddhi suspicious . . . throws a burning stick in the big tree . . . father comes down burning . . . says Paapbuddhi is guilty . . . Paapbuddhi arrested . . . moral.


The Larks in the Cornfield

A lark with her babies . . . lives in a cornfield . . . keeps careful look on the wheat and the farmer . . . always tells her children to keep an eye on the wheat and farmer while collecting food . . . wheat gets riped one day . . . farmer invites neighbours to reap it . . . lark’s babies hear this and inform their mother . . . babies excited to get moved . . . lark says that they will not . . . days later, the wheat gets much riped . . . farmer calls relatives to reap the wheat . . . babies inform their mother . . . mother does not agree to move . . . days later, farmer decides to reap the wheat himself . . . babies inform their mother . . . mother moves her house readily . . . moral.


Tom and His Aunt

A naïve boy, Tom . . . he goes everyday to see his aunt . . . one day, aunt gives a piece of cake . . . Tom happy . . . holds the cake in his fist . . . all scrunched up . . . only a fistful of cream bits left . . . mom curious . . . Tom says it is cake . . . Mom teaches the way to carry cake . . . says it should be wrapped in leaves, put inside a hat and the hat be worn . . . Tom nods his head . . . next day . . . aunt gives a piece of butter . . . Tom carries it in his hat . . . scorching weather melts the butter . . . his shirt stinks . . . mom asks what it is . . . Tom answers it to be butter . . . Mom says butter should be cooled down and carried in a closed container . . . aunt gives a puppy, the next day . . . Tom cools the puppy and then carries it in a closed container . . . puppy dies . . . mom angry . . . asks what it is . . . a puppy . . . puppy to be carried with a string tied around the its neck and dragged. . . Tom nods . . . receives a bread from aunt the next day . . . Tom carries it with a string . . . mom asks what it is . . . a bread . . . mom annoyed . . . she will not tell how to carry a bread . . . mom warns Tom about the pies on their doorstep . . . warns to be careful while passing . . . Tom ruins pies while crossing


The Retiring Carpenter

A fine carpenter . . . decides to retire . . . employer requests a last favor . . . carpenter agrees . . . does it with no enthusiasm and finesse . . . no interest in work . . . employer gives the keys of the building to the carpenter. . . says the house is a gift to the carpenter . . . carpenter shocked . . . repents. . . moral.


The Hen That Laid Golden Eggs

A poor farmer . . . has a hen . . . farmer hard-working . . . one day, hen lays a golden egg . . . farmer astonished . . . dances in joy . . . sells the egg . . . hen lays a golden egg daily . . . farmer becomes rich . . . wants to be richest . . . cuts it to get all golden eggs . . . finds no gold . . . farmer sad . . . becomes poor again . . . moral.


Who Killed the Thief?

A king . . . a man comes and says his brother died . . . king calms and asks for details . . . man says he was a thief and died while carrying a theft . . . king objects that what happened is right . . . man pleads for justice . . . requests that criminal should be punished . . . king agrees . . . asks what exactly happened . . . man narrates . . . brother gone to a merchant’s house to steal jewellery. . . made a hole . . . wall fell . . . died . . . king calls for the merchant . . . merchant says he is innocent . . . the bricklayer is at fault for not building strong wall . . . king asks for bricklayer . . . bricklayer declares he is innocent . . . blames a woman with jingling anklets . . . says she would go many a times . . . king asks for the woman . . . woman says a goldsmith was delaying her order . . . king confused . . . asks for the goldsmith . . . goldsmith says he had to complete the order of a merchant . . . the merchant was the father of the man who first came . . . no one at fault . . . king announces the thief is responsible for his own death.


The Water-Carrier Who Ruled India for a Day

Two kings, Humayun and Sher Shah . . . both enemies . . . Sher Shah vexed to see Humayun living happily . . . planned to kill Humayun at night . . . a battle took place at night . . . Humayun riding on horse to escape . . . fell in water . . . drowning . . . water-carrier saved the king’s life . . . king impressed . . . insisted that the water-carrier should be king for one day . . . water-carrier ruled India . . . ordered to cut pieces of his bag and use them as a currency for the day . . . moral.


The Monkey and the Crocodile

A wise monkey . . . lives on a big mango tree with other monkeys . . . one day, meets a crocodile . . . gives ripe mangoes to the crocodile . . . they become close friends . . . monkeys on the tree warned the monkey . . . monkey ignorant . . . crocodile takes some mangoes for his wife . . . wife loves them . . . they eat happily . . . but, the wife is wicked . . . one day, asks crocodile where does he get these mangoes . . . crocodile tells about his friendship . . . the wife wants to eat the monkey’s heart . . . she invites monkey for dinner . . . crocodile doesn’t cooperate . . . wife stubborn. . . crocodile agrees. . . invites monkey for lunch. . . monkey loves it . . . monkey on crocodile’s back . . . in the middle of the river the crocodile discloses wife’s plan . . . monkey scared . . . monkey tells that his heart is hanging on the tree . . . crocodile back to the tree . . . monkey climbs again . . . tricks the crocodile and laughs . . . says ‘heart is inside me’ . . . friendship ends . . . moral.


The Pact with the Sun

A girl, Saeeda . . . her mom seriously ill . . . general doctor advises to stay indoors with windows closed and to not eat spicy food . . . mom follows all the advice . . . but does not get cured . . . long time passes . . . neighbours support . . . they all decide to consult a specialist, though expensive . . . mom sells her jewelleries and sees a specialist . . . specialist advises to stay outdoors in bright sun and to eat healthy . . . allows little spicy food . . . mom follows specialist . . . but, the weather bad for some days . . . does not get cured . . . Saeeda distressed . . . pleads the Sun to come out . . . Sun agrees . . . mom gets cured. . . moral.


Life is an Echo

A father . . . takes his son for hiking . . . on a mountain . . . son falls . . . shouts . . . hears back his voice . . . curious . . . thinks that someone is making fun . . . calls his father to punish the stranger . . . father explains the echo of mountain . . . moral.


The Honest Woodcutter

Poor woodcutter . . . one day, cutting trees in a forest . . . axe falls in the river . . . river deep . . . weeps . . . River Goddes appears . . . woodcutter tells his problem . . . Goddess brings a golden axe . . . woodcutter says it is not his . . . refuses to take . . . Goddess brings silver axe . . . woodcutter refuses . . . Goddess brings his iron axe . . . woodcutter agrees to take iron axe . . . Goddess pleased by honesty . . . gives woodcutter all axes . . . woodcutter happy . . . moral.


Father’s Love

A father, Darius . . . his son, Zubaid . . . Zubaid seriously ill . . . Darius in tension . . . called many doctors. . . Darius pleaded God to take his own life instead of his son . . . Zubaid improved . . . opened eyes . . . Darius fell ill . . . died . . . moral.


The Lioness and the Young Jackal

A lion and lioness . . . lived together in a forest . . . lion brought food every evening . . . one day, found no food . . . saw a baby jackal . . . brought it alive . . . lioness did not agree to kill him . . . kept as her third son . . . the cubs and jackal played together . . . cubs saw an elephant, one day . . . ran after it . . . jackal stopped them and went home . . . cubs thought he was scared . . . made fun of his in front of father . . . jackal angry . . . rebuked . . . the lioness calmed him . . . explained that he should go with other jackals . . . the jackal went to mix up with other jackals . . . moral.


The Little Red Hen

A little red hen . . . very hard working . . . chickens also dedicated . . . hen’s friends, a mongoose, a dog and a cat . . . all of them very lazy . . . one day, hen found a few grains of wheat . . . wanted to plant it . . . friends refused to help . . . hen planted it herself . . . wheat ripe . . . friends refused to harvest . . . hen did it herself . . . friends again refused to carry the wheat to the miller to grind it . . . hen did it herself . . . hard work . . . friends lazily refused to bake the bread . . . the hen did herself . . . bread’s smell pleasing . . . all friends wanted it . . . hen refused because they did not help her . . . she ate it with her children . . . moral.


The Elephant and the Tailor

An elephant . . . always passes by a tailor’s shop . . . tailor kind . . . gives food to the elephant every day . . . one day, tailor angry with a customer . . . in a bad temper . . . elephant passes . . . tailor pricks with a needle instead of giving food . . . elephant dissatisfied . . . fills his trunk with dirty water . . . throws it all around in the tailor’s shop . . . tailor dirty and clothes spoiled . . . moral.


God Coming Home

An elderly lady . . . God promises her that He would visit her . . . lady happy . . . cleans and polishes . . . waits for God on her sofa . . . someone at the door . . . lady dances in joy . . . sees a poor woman at the door . . . angry . . . does not show mercy . . . sends her off . . . someone at the door again . . . elderly lady opens and sees a poor beggar . . . sends him off again . . . lady eagerly waiting . . . again, the doorbell rings . . . lady really happy . . . sees a poor child begging . . . sends him off angrily . . . finally sleeps . . . she sees God in her dreams . . . God says “I came to you three times today, but, you did not let me in.” lady stunned . . . moral.


The Lion and the Rabbit

A forest . . . a lion in it . . . lion kills animals randomly . . . many animals killed . . . animals gather . . . decide to give the lion one or two animals per day to kill and eat . . . lion agrees . . . animals roam fearlessly . . . one day, a rabbit’s turn . . . rabbit scared . . . takes a very long time to approach lion . . . lion furious . . . rabbit says he met another bold lion while coming . . . lion curious and decides to kill the other lion, his enemy . . . rabbit narrates the lion to a well . . . lion peeps . . . jumps in the well . . . moral.


The Loyal Mongoose

A farmer lived with his wife . . . had a baby . . . looking for a pet . . . farmer found a mongoose while returning home . . . carried it home . . . asked his wife whether to keep it as a pet . . . wife suspicious but agreed . . . baby and mongoose best friends . . . wife went out to bring vegetables one day . . . baby sleeping . . . farmer remembered some work left . . . saw the mongoose guarding the sleeping baby . . . went to his farm without tension . . . wife returned . . . mongoose came running to the door to welcome . . . wife saw the mongoose with mouth full of blood . . . terrified . . . rebuked, “You wicked creature! You killed my baby!” . . . thinking that mongoose killed the baby, she killed the mongoose . . . threw the bag full of vegetables . . . went inside . . . saw a dead snake . . . baby crying . . . understood that the mongoose had saved her baby’s life . . . repented . . . moral.


The Tale of Two Birds

A mother bird . . . her two young ones . . . in a forest . . . mother bird killed in storm . . . young birds saved . . . separated from each-other . . . each found a home . . . one landed in a cave of robbers . . . second one reached a rishi’s ashram . . . grew up . . . king came to the forest for hunting . . . saw a deer . . . ran after it . . . tired . . . sat near a cave . . . amazed to hear a voice of a bird ordering to rob the king . . . it was the bird that landed near the cave . . . king ran away on his horse . . . reached a rishi’s ashram . . . heard another voice of bird welcoming politely . . . confused . . . asked rishi about the birds . . . rishi explained everything . . . one is by the company one keeps . . . moral.


The Talkative Tortoise

A tortoise . . . talkative . . . has two friends, swans . . . close friends . . . their lake about to dry up . . . swans tell tortoise to grab a stick in mouth and they will hold the stick in hands and take away tortoise to another lake . . . but, they warn that the tortoise must not utter a word . . . tortoise agrees . . . they do as planned . . . people astonished to see the swans carrying tortoise . . . tortoise unable to shut his mouth . . . speaks out, “Shut up!” . . . falls . . . dies . . . moral.


The Iron-Eating Rats

A merchant named Lakshman . . . in debt . . . had weighing scales made from solid iron . . . really precious . . . Lakshman left the scales with a friend, Nanduka and went abroad. . . Nanduka really greedy . . . Lakshman came back from abroad . . . Nanduka denied giving scales . . . “rats ate them” . . . Lakshman realized his friend’s greediness . . . kept quiet . . . said he wanted to bath in a nearby river . . . asked Nanduka to send his son to carry bathing things and look after clothes . . . Nanduka sent his son happily . . . Lakshman hid his son in cave…Nanduka asked for his son . . . “Falcon took him away” . . . Nanduka angry . . . quarrel . . . court case . . . Judge asked “How can falcon lift a boy” . . . Lakshman replied “in the same way as rats ate iron” . . . judge understood everything . . . gave verdict in Lakshman’s favour . . . Lakshman returned his son, he returned scales . . . moral


A Wolf in a Sheepskin

A wolf . . . hungry . . . sees sheep . . . wants to eat them . . . finds a sheepskin . . . puts it on . . . goes among the sheep . . . naïve sheep think it as a sheep . . . wolf eats some sheep every day . . . lives happily . . . shepherd catches the wolf to eat it himself . . . wolf dead . . . moral.


Androclus and the Lion

A slave in Carthage . . . cruel master . . . slave wants to get rid of his master . . . runs away into a forest . . . sleeps that night in a cave . . . sound sleep . . . waked up by terrible roar . . . sees lion coming into cave . . . terrified . . . but lion quite gentle . . . shows his wounded paw . . . slave takes out a big thorn . . . lion grateful and wags his tail happily . . . slave and lion live together as friends . . . slave not afraid of the lion . . . soldiers searching for the slave . . . slave is caught by his master . . . condemned by judge to be thrown to lions . . . thousands of on-lookers . . . people laughing . . . slave brought out . . . lion rushes to attack him . . . but when he sees slave, lies down and licks his feet . . . the same lion . . . people astonished . . . governor sends for the slave . . . hears his story . . . frees slave and gives him the lion . . . moral.


The Nobleman, the Fisherman and the Porter

Rich nobleman . . . gives a grand feast . . . delicious food . . . but no fish . . . nobleman wishes to have at least one fish . . . his steward tells him a fisherman has brought a fine fish . . . nobleman tells him to pay him his price . . . steward says his price is a hundred lashes . . . nobleman confused . . . sends for fisherman . . . fisherman confirms steward’s report . . . nobleman agrees . . . fisherman quietly receives fifty lashes . . . then asks to stop . . . says, he has a partner to whom he promised half the price . . . “Who is he?”, asked nobleman . . . fisherman says it is porter . . . continues that the porter refused to let him in if he did not agree to pay the half price . . . porter brought in and given the other fifty lashes . . . guests enjoy joke . . . nobleman rewards the fisherman . . . moral.


The Tiger, Jackal and the Brahmin

A Brahmin . . . travelling through deadly forest . . . comes across a tiger caught in a trap . . . tiger begs the Brahmin to open the cage . . . Brahmin in pity does so . . . tiger knocks him down . . . Brahmin pleads for his life and says the tiger is ungrateful . . . tiger agrees that he may appeal to three things against tiger . . . Brahmin first asks a pipal tree . . . tree says all men are ungrateful . . . tree gives them shade and they cut its branches . . . Brahmin next asks the road . . . the road says that in return for its services men trample on it with heavy boots . . . Brahmin then asks a buffalo . . . buffalo says her master beats her and makes her turn a Persian wheel . . . Brahmin in despair . . . consults a jackal . . . jackal asks how tiger got into cage . . . tiger jumps in to show the jackal . . . jackal shuts cage and walks away with Brahmin . . . moral.


The Stone on the Road

A king . . . distressed because of his lazy people . . . wants to teach them a lesson . . . he puts a big stone in the middle of a road one night . . . next day king watches from side . . . sees merchants pass and go round it . . . an officer driving in his carriage does the same . . . a young soldier comes riding, does the same . . . all curse the stone and blame the government for not removing it . . . then, in the evening, a girl comes . . . girl tired by working. . . notices the stone . . . removes it out of the road . . . sees an iron box under the stone . . . on the iron box, it was marked, “For the man who moves away the stone” . . . girl curious . . . opens the box . . . inside a purse . . . the purse full of money . . . girl rejoices . . . the people ashamed.


Baghdad Merchant and the Camel-Driver

Baghdad merchant . . . has expensive silk . . . about to go with a caravan to Damascus . . . suddenly falls ill . . . entrusts his bales of silk to a camel-driver . . . says he will go to Damascus as soon as he gets well . . . will pay camel-driver when he arrives . . . camel-driver agrees . . . waits in Damascus with the silk . . . no sign of the merchant . . . camel-driver tired . . . sells the silk for a large sum . . . shaves his beard, dyes his hair and dresses in fine clothes . . . Baghdad merchant at last arrives . . . searches whole Damascus for camel-driver . . . one day recognizes him . . . camel-driver pretends to be a merchant of Samarkand . . . they quarrel . . . Baghdad merchant brings him before the judge . . . judge decides he can do nothing, as there are no witnesses . . . camel-driver happy . . . leaves court . . . judge suddenly calls out “Camel-driver!” . . . he stops and turns round . . . judge puts him in prison, and makes him pay money to Baghdad merchant . . . moral.


A Purse of a Hundred Pieces of Gold

A miser . . . loses a purse of a hundred pieces of gold . . . in great distress . . . goes to town crier for advice . . . crier says he must offer a reward . . . offers reward of ten pieces of gold . . . the crier announces this . . . a few days later a farmer finds the purse . . . comes to the miser and returns it . . . miser counts the money . . . a hundred pieces of gold . . . thanks the farmer . . . the farmer asks for the reward . . . miser says there were a hundred and ten pieces in the purse, so the farmer has already taken his reward of ten pieces . . . they quarrel . . . farmer appeals to the judge . . . the judge hears the case, and asks for the purse . . . sees that it only holds a hundred pieces . . . decides it cannot be the miser’s purse . . . so gives the purse to farmer . . . the miser overreaches out of greed . . . has to walk without any gold . . . moral.


The Old Pipal Tree

A young man . . . goes abroad for business . . . accompanied part way by an old man . . . young man asks old man to keep Rs. 100 for him till he returns . . . old man agrees quickly and takes money . . . they part under a big pipal tree . . . young man continues his journey . . . old man is a palm reader and so sits under the tree . . . young man returns after months . . . asks old man to give his money back . . . old man says he never gave him any to keep . . . young man angry . . . they quarrel . . . takes him before judge . . . judge sends young man to summon tree to court as a proof . . . a long time away . . . judge asks old man, “Why is it too long to summon the tree?” . . . old man says tree is long way off . . . judge sees that the old man knows which tree it is . . . when young man returns, judge gives verdict in his favour . . . moral.


The Loyal Nurse

A son is born to a Rajah . . . the mother dies in childbirth . . . king needs a nurse . . . a young mother with a son is chosen as nurse . . . she nurses both babies together . . . enemies of the Rajah plot to kill his son . . . they bribe the guards and get into the palace . . . the nurse is warned just in time . . . nurse quickly changes the children’s dresses . . . leaves her own child dressed as prince and flies with real prince . . . enemies enter room and kill the nurse’s baby,  thinking it is the prince . . . so prince is saved . . . Rajah offers nurse rewards . . . she refuses them . . . kills herself . . . Rajah grieved . . . erects splendid tomb for the faithful nurse . . . moral.


The Snake Named Mandvisha

An old lazy snake . . . could move in various patterns . . . wanted to find a way of getting food easily . . . one day, found an idea . . . went and sat on a nearby lake . . . lake full of frogs . . . snake acting sad . . . one frog asked what happened . . . snake said that he had bitten a son of brahmin while chasing a frog . . . father had cursed the snake to carry frogs on back . . . the frog heard the story . . . told it to other frogs . . . frogs told it to the king . . . king glad . . . sits on the snake with other frogs . . . snake happy . . . trick worked . . . moved in various patterns . . . frogs enjoyed . . . next day . . . the snake sluggish . . . frogs asked what happened . . . snake said he was hungry . . . the king of frogs offered some frogs to eat . . . snake happy . . . ate a few frogs every day . . . got his food without any effort . . . moral.


The Barber of Baghdad

Ali . . . a barber in Baghdad . . . Hassan, a wood-seller . . . Wood scarce in Baghdad . . . Hassan brings a load of wood on a donkey to Ali for sale . . . they bargain about the price . . . at last Hassan offers all the wood on the donkey’s back for nominal price . . . Ali agrees . . . Hassan unloads the wood and gives it to Ali . . . Ali claims donkey’s wooden saddles . . . Hassan protests . . . quarrel . . . Ali seizes saddle and drives Hassan away with blows . . . Hassan appeals to Khalif . . . Khalif gives him advice . . . some days later Hassan goes to Ali’s shop . . . asks Ali to shave him and a friend for so much . . . Ali agrees . . . shaves Hassan first . . . Hassan then tells that his friend is outside waiting. . . Hassan fetches in his donkey . . . Ali refuses to shave donkey . . . drives Hassan away . . . Hassan reports to Khalif . . . Khalif sends for Ali . . . forces him to fulfill his bargain . . . Ali has to shave Hassan’s friend, the donkey, before all the courtiers . . . great laughter, and shame for Ali . . . moral.


King Solomon and the Bees

King Solomon . . . noted for his wisdom . . . Queen of Sheba hears of his fame . . . comes to visit him . . . impressed by his wealth, palace and grandeur . . . wants to test the king’s power of solving puzzles . . . shows him two garlands of flowers . . . one is real, the other artificial . . . asks, “Which is the real and which is the artificial one?” . . . courtiers puzzled . . . both garlands identical . . . Solomon silent . . . Queen feels triumphant . . . Solomon orders windows to be opened . . . bees fly in from garden . . . they buzz about the Queen . . . all settle on garland in her right hand . . . Solomon says the flowers in right hand real, in left hand artificial . . . Queen impressed with his wisdom . . . courtiers stunned . . . moral.


The Tiger and the Golden Bangle

A tiger in a forest . . . kills an Indian lady travelling through the jungle . . . as he eats her body, he notices her gold bangle . . . keeps it as he thinks it may be useful . . . later hides himself by a pool . . . traveller comes to pool, dusty and tired . . . strips and bathes in cool water . . . sees the tiger in bushes watching him . . . terrified . . . tiger greets him . . . with a mild voice, says that he is pious and spends time in prayer . . . as a sign of goodwill, offers the traveller the golden bangle . . . traveller’s greed overcomes his fear . . . crossed pool to take bangle . . . tiger springs on him and kills him.


The Inchcape Rock

A pirate . . . becalms near rocky coast . . . pirate sees bell fastened to dangerous submerged rock . . . asks what it is . . . is told it was placed there to warn sailors in storms . . . thinks it is useless . . . rows across in boat to rock . . . cuts the chain and sinks the bell . . . wind rises and they sail away . . . years after . . . pirate returns with enormous wealth . . . entire ship covered with jewels, gold and pearls . . . sea covered with fog and storm rising . . . pirate does not know where he is . . . pirate motivates his sailors to go on sailing . . . pirate terrified . . . a terrible crash . . . ship strikes on the same rock . . . as they go down the pirate realizes his ship wrecked on the same rock . . . pirate wishes he had left the bell alone . . . repents . . . moral.


Tit for Tat

A jackal . . . wants crabs on the other side of a river . . . wonders how to get across . . . tells camel that there is sugarcane the other side . . . camel happy . . . agrees to carry him across in return for the information . . . they cross . . . jackal finishes his meal . . . plays trick on camel . . . runs round the fields howling . . . villagers rush out . . . see camel in sugarcane . . . beat him with sticks . . . camel runs to river . . . jackal jumps on his back . . . while crossing, camel asks jackal why he played him such a trick . . . jackal says he always howls after a good meal . . . camel replies he always takes a bath after a good meal . . . rolls in the river . . . jackal nearly drowned . . . moral


The Blind Lady and a Greedy Doctor

An old lady . . . becomes blind . . . calls in a doctor . . . aggress to pay large fee only if completely cured . . . but no fee if not cured . . . the doctor comes to the lady’s house everyday . . . doctor loves lady’s furniture . . . gets jealous . . . covets of lady’s furniture . . . delays the cure . . . every day takes away some of her furniture . . . at last, cures her . . . demands his fees . . . lady refuses to pay, saying the cure is not complete . . . doctor angry . . . brings a court case . . . judge asks lady why she will not pay . . . she says sight not properly restored . . . she cannot see all her furniture . . . judge gives verdict in her favor . . . moral.


The Tale of the Many-Times-Killed Hunchback

A tailor in Baghdad . . . met a hunchback . . . invited him to his house . . . his wife served fish . . . a large piece of fish stuck in hunchback’s throat . . . hunchback died . . . tailor scared . . . the dead body to a Jewish physician . . . set the dead man against the wall . . . the physician struck against hunchback’s body . . . physician thought that the sick man died with his blow . . . placed the dead body in the terrace of his neighbor . . . a steward and a Muslim . . . the steward thought a thief was hiding . . . struck with a mallet . . . thought he killed the hunchback . . . took the body to market place . . . placed the dead hunchback there . . . soon came a Christian clerk in intoxication . . . struck him . . . the watchman handed him over to the governor. . . he was to be hanged . . . when the rope was put around his neck, came running the Muslim steward . . . confessed . . . the rope was put in his neck . . . when the Muslim steward was to be hanged, came the Jewish physician running . . . confessed and the rope was put around his neck . . . in the end came the tailor . . . the unique case was presented before the king . . . pleased that so many honest and sincere people in his kingdom . . . set all of them free . . . moral.


The Patient Little Girl

A village . . . terrible famine in it . . . people and children starving . . . rich man . . . started to give bread to children . . . long queues in front of the camps . . . the queues broken . . . children fighting for food . . . a little girl in the queue . . . stood there patiently . . . got the smallest loaf of bread . . . the rich man rewarded with two coins in the bread . . . girl went to return them . . . man impressed by her honesty . . . gave two more coins . . . girl happy . . . moral.


The Pied Piper of Hamelin

A town in Germany . . . full of rats . . . people tired . . . mayor set a reward for the person who rids the town of the rats . . . a strange young man . . . man pied-dressed . . . offers to get the town rid of rats . . . mayor gives him a chance . . . says he would give the reward after disappearing the rats . . . man agrees . . . plays a beautiful tune the next morning . . . all the rats come out . . . run after him . . . man puts all of them in the river . . . rats disappear . . . but, the mayor refuses to reward . . . says such deal never happened . . . man angry . . . next noon, man plays his pipe . . . people laughing . . . but, children come out and dance in the tune . . . many children . . . parents force to come back, but in vain . . . man hid all the children in a cave . . . two children saved . . . told to the town everything . . . town repented . . . got children back . . . rewarded the man . . . moral.


The Boy Who Cried “Wolf!”

A boy ordered to look after sheep by villagers . . . villagers told to shriek out if a wolf happened to come . . . boy agreed . . . grazed sheep . . . the whole time in the pasture . . . bored . . . decides to fool villagers by shouting, “Wolf!” . . . shouted . . . villagers rushed . . . fooled . . . boy played the same trick again . . . villagers fooled again . . . villagers angry . . . a wolf came . . . boy shouted, but in vain . . . no one came . . . moral.


The Rabbit, the Whale and the Elephant

A rabbit . . . very wise . . . hears an elephant and a whale talking of becoming kings . . . blushes . . . requests elephant to get his dear cow out of mud by pulling a rope . . . rabbit grabs a strong rope and ties around elephants trunk . . . requests the whale to do the same . . . ties the same rope to the whale’s tail . . . asks both to pull . . . both pull each other . . . rabbit laughs . . . rope breaks . . . both find each other pulling . . . quarrel . . . moral.


The Cunning Fox and the Foolish Crow

A crow steals a piece of bread . . . sits on a tree to eat it . . . bread in his beak . . . a hungry fox sees the crow . . . wishes to eat the piece of bread . . . adulates the crow’s voice . . . begs to sing once . . . the crow caws . . . piece of bread falls down . . . fox gulps it . . . foolish crow . . . moral.


The Fox and the Goat

A fox . . . thirsty . . . searches for water . . . finds a well . . . peeps to drink water . . . falls . . . drowning . . . a goat comes . . . looks into the well . . . fox says he is enjoying the water . . . asks the goat to come in . . . goat jumps . . . the fox climbs up the goat and comes out . . . goat drowning . . . moral.


The Stork and the Crab

An old stork . . . cannot catch fish . . . one day, struck with an idea . . . sat sadly near the lake . . . a crab asks about the matter . . . stork says a famine will occur and the lake will dry up . . . worried . . . says some soothsayers say so . . . all crabs and fish hear the news . . . stork responds that there is a way to escape . . . a lake nearby . . . all creature present there agree . . . creatures cannot get out of water . . . stork suggests, “I will carry some of you in my beak and quickly fly over the other lake. You all will reach safely.” . . . fish and other animals agree . . . stork takes some fish . . . goes to a deserted place and eats them . . . takes the crab too . . . brings to the deserted place . . . reveals the truth . . . crab bites in stork’s neck . . . stork dead . . . crab returns . . . moral.


Shooting the Bird’s Eye

Guru Dronacharya . . . saw Arjuna practising archery at night . . . impressed . . . next day, selected a tree in forest . . . placed a wooden bird on a bare branch . . . ordered the Pandavas to hit the bird in the eye . . . Yudhisthir stepped forward . . . “Can you see me?” asked Dronacharya . . . “Yes” replied Yudhisthir . . . Dronacharya asked him to put down the bow . . . next prince . . . Dronacharya asked the same question and got the same reply . . . each prince replied the same . . . asked to retire from the competition . . . finally came Arjuna . . . “Arjuna, do you see me?” asked Dronacharya . . . “I see only my target,” said Arjuna . . . Arjuna hit the bird’s eye . . . moral.


The Foolish Stork and the Crab

A tree . . . lots of stork families in it . . . a snake in the hollow . . . eats away all the babies of storks . . . one day, a stork sees this and sits sadly near a lake . . . a crab asks about the matter . . . stork tells about the snake . . . crab seems to be sad . . . wicked . . . suggests to leave a piece of dead fish in the hollow . . . a mongoose will come running and will eat away the snake . . . stork agrees . . . does so . . . mongoose comes . . . eats the snake and storks . . . storks dead . . . crab happy . . . moral.


Eklavya’s Loyalty

Eklavya . . . adores Guru Dronacharya . . . perfect in archery . . . but, Guru Dronacharya refuses to teach him . . . loves Arjuna . . . Eklavya makes a statue of Dronacharya through mud and sand . . . practises archery in front of it . . . gets better . . . Dronacharya and Arjuna, once, walking past Eklavya’s house . . . a dog barking . . . Eklavya hits in its mouth . . . Dog not killed but definitely harmed . . . Arjuna and Dronacharya surprised by archery . . . sees Eklavya . . . Dronacharya praises him . . . Dronacharya asks for gurudakshina . . . asks for Eklavya’s thumb for giving knowledge . . . Dronacharya’s evil intentions . . . Eklavya gives away his thumb . . . still practises archery . . . moral.


How Squirrel Got Its Stripes

Lord Rama . . . his army building a bridge to cross the river to defeat Ravana . . . many moneys working . . . a little squirrel carrying pebbles to help Lord Rama . . . a monkey notices . . . makes fun . . . all monkeys laugh . . . one monkey pushes the squirrel . . . squirrel goes far away . . . falls right in the hands of Lord Rama . . . Rama carresses her . . . Rama explains the monkeys . . . monkeys ashamed . . . squirrel continues her work . . . moral.


Birbal Identifies the Thief

A rich merchant . . . gifted a golden necklace to his wife . . . wife happy . . . necklace lost . . . both sad . . . went to Emperor Akbar . . . Akbar ordered Birbal to solve the case . . . Birbal grabbed some sticks . . . gave to all the servants of the merchant . . . said the thief’s stick will get longer by an inch till the next morning . . . next day, all the sticks same except one . . . one of them shorter by one inch . . . the thief had cut the stick by an inch to not get suspected . . . Birbal caught the thief . . . moral.


The Talking Cave

An old lion . . . finds difficult to hunt food . . . one day, sees a cave . . . hides in cave awaiting his prey to enter . . . cave belongs to intelligent jackal . . . jackal returns . . . sees lion paws entering cave . . . suspects danger . . . an idea . . . shrieks out the name of the cave . . . gets no response . . . shrieks again . . . lion worries . . . thinks the cave talks but is afraid due to his presence . . . lion responses pretending to be the cave . . . jackal gets alerted . . . escapes . . . impatient and silly lion goes hungry again . . . moral.